Rabbit Population Densities at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico (1992-2004)

Summary

Abstract: 

This study measured the population dynamics of black-tail jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) and desert cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus auduboni) in the grasslands and creosote shrublands of McKenzie Flats, Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge.  The study was begun in January, 1992, and continued quarterly each year.  Rabbits were sampled via night-time spotlight transect sampling along the roads of McKenzie Flats during winter, spring, summer, and fall of each year.  The entire road transect was 21.5 miles in length. Measurements of perpendicular distance of each rabbit from the center of the road were used to estimate densities (number of rabbits per square kilometer) via Program DISTANCE.  Results from 1992 to 2002 indicated that spring was the peak density period of the year, with generally steady declines through the year until the following spring. Evidence of a long-term "cycle" (e.g., the 11 year cycle reported for rabbits in the Great Basin Desert) did not appear in the Sevilleta rabbit populations.

Data set ID: 

113
Categories
Dates

Date Range: 

Monday, January 20, 1992 to Monday, May 3, 2004

Publication Date: 

Monday, February 15, 2016
People

Owner/Creator: 

Contact: 

Additional Project roles: 

Role: 

Field Crew

Role: 

Lab Crew
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