What should I bring with me this summer?

Students should bring what will make for a comfortable and enjoyable summer. The top two items which are almost universally desired are sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat. Here is a suggested Summer Equipment List to consider:
Long pants or jeans
Shorts
Tennis Shoes and/or Hiking Boots
T-shirts and Long sleeved shirts
Rainwear and Windbreakers
Sweatshirts and Sweaters
Hat
Bandannas
Flashlight
Sunglasses
Sunscreen
Backpack
Water Bottles
Tupperware
Bug Spray
First Aid Kit

What does the program coordinator do?

The Program Coordinator/Research Scientist lives on site. The Coordinator organizes group activities, seminars, journal club meeting and oversees the weekly REU meeting, while also assisting students having any problems, acting as a mentor regarding research projects and ensures that students follow abide by field station rules.

What does the program coordinator do?

The Program Coordinator/Research Scientist lives on site. The Coordinator organizes group activities, seminars, journal club meeting and oversees the weekly REU meeting, while also assisting students having any problems, acting as a mentor regarding research projects and ensures that students follow abide by field station rules.

What is the housing like?

Students live in 3 bedroom, 2 bath houses at the UNM Sevilleta Field Station. Each of the houses can accomodate 6 individuals, twin beds in each bedroom. Usually one of the houses is co-ed, rooms are always single sex. Most students will have 1 roommate. Please note that linens, blankets and towels are provided and there are washing machines in each house. The kitchens are also equipped with microwaves, coffeemakers, dishes, pots, pans and utensils.

What is the food plan like?

Students are responsible for purchasing and cooking their own meals. Every Thursday their is a seminar and a themed potluck where each house is responsible for bringing a minimum of 2 side dishes, the main course is provided by the Sevilleta LTER.

What are the major health risks?

There are health risks associated with lab and field research. Students working in the lab may be exposed to caustic chemicals and other toxic substances. Students working in the field often have to travel over uneven ground, and through areas with biting insects,rattle snakes, and sticking plants.
The most common health problems result from reactions to SUN BURNS. So make sure you pack plenty of sunscreen, a widebrimmed hat and where long sleeve shirts and pants in the field.

What is expected of students? What is expected of mentors?

The summer program is a core part of the research and education mission of the Sevilleta LTER. While every student, mentor and project is different, we place high expectations on all the students and their mentors to ensure everyone has an excellent albeit demanding research experience. These expectations are stated explicitly for mentors and students and program staff seek to ensure all participants understand them and act within this spirit.

What makes for an excellent application?

The Program Coordinator looks at many different aspects of a student's application but generally previous coursework, good grades, extracurricular activities, or relevant work experience. The Coordinator also looks for students with excellent potential but in need of a their independent first research experience. The one area that is invaluable is the personal essay as an indicator of an applicant's background and their interest in the projects offered in this year’s program.

What are you looking for in successful applicants?

Similar to most REU programs, the Sevilleta LTER REU Program receives many more applications than available funded positions. Overall, the pool of students hired will come with a wide variety of experience and educational backgrounds. A small portion of students hired are rising freshman who show an interest in ecology but of course do not have significant course work or experience. The majority of students hired are sophomores and juniors who have a background in relevant science courses.

How many hours do I work per week? Will I work nights and weekends?

Students work typically 40 hours per week however that varies with each project needs. Some projects require early morning, late night or weekend work, which should be included in the project description as well as detailed by the researcher during the interview process. In addition, there are one-hour to two-hour educational workshops and seminars held one to three evenings per week after dinner. All participants are required to attend these educational programs.

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